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Minor phrasing changes

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Graham Northup 3 years ago
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Signed by untrusted user: grissess GPG Key ID: 5D000E6F539376FB
  1. 2
      Items/focus_of_extension.txt
  2. 4
      Rules/Variant/perfect_plane_shift.txt

2
Items/focus_of_extension.txt

@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ If the same spell cast at the same level on the same targets (and with the same
Effects that cause the spell to end normally may still dispel it. For example, if the spell says the caster may end it as an action, this can be done by the caster at anytime. (If it doesn't, any caster with access to the focus can use it to cast another spell, and, in doing so, effect the ending of the former spell.) Similarly, the spell ends if no valid target exists for it anymore--but especially powerful combinations of indefinite spells can overcome this (see below).
A typical usage is to leave an environmental effect in place for as long as needed; for example, Alarm, Minor Illusion, Silent Image, and so forth. More devious users may use enchantments instead, such as Friends or Suggestion, comforted by the extended, or even indefinite, time. Perhaps the most dangerous spells are transmutation and necromancy, such as Regenerate and (True) Resurrection; the latter has effects not unlike the Necromancer's Ring (see), but it might be impossible for the target to dispel it even if they want to. Similarly, a great fiend might make permanent a cast of Dominate Person/Monster and guard their focus on their person, in a great vault, or even throw it into the open ocean, gaining--if their spell save DC is high enough relative to the target's Wisdom--a permanent slave. A permanent Wall of Force may be as powerful as Imprisonment, but the target still suffers the effects of age, lack of food/water, and, eventually, suffocation, unless those are accounted for otherwise. Not all effects are bad; indefinite Mage Armor and indefinite Longstrider can permanently increase some important statistics. All of these are examples, and the lasting effects are up to interpretation by the DM.
A typical usage is to leave an environmental effect in place for as long as needed; for example, Alarm, Minor Illusion, Silent Image, and so forth. More devious users may use enchantments instead, such as Friends or Suggestion, comforted by the extended, or even indefinite, time. Perhaps the most dangerous spells are transmutation and necromancy, such as Regenerate and (True) Resurrection; the latter has effects not unlike the Necromancer's Ring (see), but it might be impossible for the target to dispel it even if they want to. Similarly, a great fiend might make permanent a cast of Dominate Person/Monster and guard their focus on their person, in a great vault, or even throw it into the open ocean, gaining--if their spell save DC is high enough relative to the target's Wisdom--a permanent slave. A permanent Wall of Force may be as powerful as Imprisonment, but the target still suffers the effects of age, lack of food/water, and, eventually, suffocation, unless those are accounted for otherwise (and the wall remains vulnerable to Disintegrate). A Forcecage, when not a solid box, can fix the suffocation problem, allow for food and water to pass, and can't be dispelled until the Focus of Extension is found and cleared or destroyed, but both of these won't stop any creature which can teleport or plane shift, and can be temporarily defeated with an Antimagic Field. Not all effects are bad; indefinite Mage Armor, Shield, Sanctuary, Longstrider, and Enhance Ability can permanently increase some important statistics or grant powerful ambient advantage. All of these are examples, and the lasting effects are up to interpretation by the DM.
Such foci can be created by targeting a focus with a 9th level cast of Permanency, an extremely rare and difficult-to-find spell, likely to only be a single-use scroll. [The spell is attested in 3.5e, but not in 5e; a wizard that can cast Wish should be able to emulate the effect.]

4
Rules/Variant/perfect_plane_shift.txt

@ -3,4 +3,6 @@ Perfect Plane Shift
Clerics, Warlocks, Druids, Sorcerers, and Wizards at (or sufficiently near) level 20, and familiar with the destination (as would be determined by the familiarity table of Teleport) can use two consecutive actions and two casts of Plane Shift to teleport to a familiar destination on the same plane. This teleportation occurs without error.
The Plane Shifting creature must pass through a different plane, the "transitory plane", to achieve the full teleport. Clerics and Warlocks typically pass through the plane of their deity without incident. Druids, Sorcerers, and Wizards may earn some ire by transiting through the domain of some powerful, unknown source; roll a d100, on 1: the Plane Shift succeeds, but invokes the wrath of some extraplanar entity (e.g., a devil of Baator, a Githyanki invasion, a deity themself) in doing so. The exact consequences depend on the entity, but can range from a smoldering enmity to an immediate attack--potentially using the Plane Shifter's own portal.
The Plane Shifting creature must pass through a different plane, the "transitory plane", to achieve the full teleport. Clerics and Warlocks typically pass through the plane of their deity without incident. Druids, Sorcerers, and Wizards may earn some ire by transiting through the domain of some powerful, unknown being; roll a d100, on 1: the Plane Shift succeeds, but invokes the wrath of some extraplanar entity (e.g., a devil of Baator, a Githyanki invasion, a deity themself) in doing so. The exact consequences depend on the entity, but can range from a smoldering enmity to an immediate attack--potentially using the Plane Shifter's own portal.
For this to work, two tuning forks are required, as per the components of Plane Shift. The Material Plane tuning fork is extremely easy to manufacture and to come by; the one for the transitory plane depends. Powerful religious orders may be able to reliably create the tuning fork to the plane of their deity, and some exacting arcane casters can create a tuning fork very precisely tuned to a demiplane of theirs (in which case they can pass without the likelihood of an incident detailed above). A callously made tuning fork, such as one made by arbitrarily shaving a Material Plane fork, might work, but it will probably send the user to the Astral Plane, the Outlands, or even a different Outer Plane each time--where one has a chance of encountering some horrible enemy.
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